13 Dec, 2018

Kofi Annan: a man who paid his dues to global peace and security

He became Secretary-General of the United Nations (UN) a few years after the demise of the Soviet Union. The collapse of the bi-polar world reduced to the barest minimum the constraints imposed by the Cold War rivalry on the world body. It also led to the expansion of its role and responsibilities to address the new challenges and dimensions of security. …

10 Dec, 2018

New Court Docs: Maker of Tylenol Had a Plan to Block Tougher Regulation

Recently filed court documents show the makers of Tylenol planned to enlist the White House and lawmakers to block the Food and Drug Administration from imposing tough new safety restrictions on acetaminophen, the iconic painkiller’s chief ingredient. …

06 Dec, 2018

Wings of desire, demise and adaptation: birds in Australian art

Human-bird interaction, (both the good and the bad), is a dominant theme amid the 70 artworks in Birds: Flight Paths in Australian Art. This review explores the exhibition from an ecologist’s mindset. …

03 Dec, 2018

App ‘trained’ to spot crop disease, alert farmers

A team of scientists has received US$100,000 grant to refine a mobile application (app) that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose crop diseases, and aims to help millions of African smallholders. …

29 Nov, 2018

A Hog Waste Agreement Lacked Teeth, and Some North Carolinians Say They’re Left to Suffer

Today, many farmers continue to store the waste in open pits despite the millions of dollars in private investment spent and years of research and political promises. The practice grows more hazardous with each hurricane that pounds the state. Nearly 20 years ago, North Carolina faced a reckoning. Hurricane Floyd inundated the state, flooding the open pits where farmers store hog waste. The nation looked on in horror as pink sludge from the lagoons mingled with rising floodwaters to force stranded animals atop hog houses and drowned thousands of pigs. …

26 Nov, 2018

No, crying doesn’t release toxins, though it might make you feel better… if that’s what you believe

Crying is a big part of being a kid. As you grow older, you may find you’re crying less than during childhood and adolescence. Studies show, on average, adult women tend to cry two to three times in a given month, and men only once. Although research is limited, it suggests crying frequency is highly influenced by social and cultural factors, our beliefs about the value of crying and how it is evaluated. …

22 Nov, 2018

Q&A: ‘It doesn’t matter if you improve your productivity ten-fold’

Gilbert Houngbo took over the presidency of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in April this year, following posts with other UN agencies and a four-year term as prime minister of Togo. …

19 Nov, 2018

Nearly All the Officers in Charge of an Indiana Police Department Have Been Disciplined – Including the Chief Who Keeps Promoting Them

Of the 34 supervisors in the Elkhart, Indiana, Police Department, 28 have been disciplined. Fifteen have been suspended. Seven have been involved in fatal shootings. Three have been convicted of criminal charges. This article was produced in partnership with the South Bend Tribune, a member of ProPublica’s Local Reporting Network. …

15 Nov, 2018

There are many good ideas to tackle inequality – it’s time we acted on them

This is the final article in the Reclaiming the Fair Go series, a collaboration between The Conversation, the Sydney Democracy Network and the Sydney Peace Foundation to mark the awarding of the 2018 Sydney Peace Prize to Nobel laureate and economics professor Joseph Stiglitz. These articles reflect on the crisis caused by economic inequality and how we can break the cycle of power and greed to enable all peoples and the planet to flourish. …

12 Nov, 2018

Q&A: ‘Research in the global South is of higher quality’

An article published in the journal Nature last month (July 5) puts forward a new technique for the evaluation of research on development. It marks a departure from conventional approaches that, according to the authors, have significant weaknesses. …

08 Nov, 2018

Rudy Giuliani’s Mystery Trips to Russia, Armenia and Ukraine – “Trump, Inc.” Podcast

Rudy Giuliani has had many identities in his time on the public stage. A crusading federal prosecutor who struck terror in mobsters and Wall Street titans alike. A sometimes-cantankerous New York City mayor who became a national hero for his stirring leadership after the 9/11 attacks. …

05 Nov, 2018

What are ‘decodable readers’ and do they work?

The Victorian Coalition has promised $2.8 million for “decodable readers” for schools if they win the upcoming election. Money for books must surely be a good thing. But what exactly is a “decodable reader”? After all, surely all books are decodable. If they weren’t decodable they would be unreadable. …

01 Nov, 2018

The HIV epidemic will not end unless we prioritise youth mental health

This is because advances in HIV testing and in improving the lives of people with HIB are not spread evenly across countries and age groups. One group frequently struggling to access these advances is young people. …

29 Oct, 2018

What Happens When a Pipeline Runs Afoul of Government Rules? Authorities Change the Rules.

Federal authorities halted work on the massive Mountain Valley Pipeline this month after an appeals court ruled that federal agencies neglected to follow environmental protections. A week ago, the federal government halted work on a massive pipeline project that runs from Northern West Virginia through Southern Virginia. …

25 Oct, 2018

I Love Dick and Bridget Jones are back, but not much has changed for women since the 90s

In 1995, the Independent ran the first instalment of Bridget Jones’s Diary, an anonymous column diarising the exploits of a 32-year-old London “singleton”. The following year, the column’s author, Helen Fielding, published a novel by the same name, continuing the title character’s documentation of her primary obsessions: weight loss, cigarettes, wine, and dating. …

22 Oct, 2018

The Syrian crisis needs targeted mental health research

The conflict in Syria is entering its sixth year. It is the largest humanitarian emergency both in terms of the needs of affected people and the funds requested to address them (US$3.18 billion) through the Syria Humanitarian Response Plan. …

18 Oct, 2018

Charlottesville’s Other Jim Crow Legacy: Separate and Unequal Education

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — High school seniors Zyahna Bryant and Trinity Hughes have been friends since they were 6 years old, raised by blue-collar families in this affluent college town. They played on the same T-ball and softball teams and were in the same church group. …

15 Oct, 2018

Organic farming with gene editing: An oxymoron or a tool for sustainable agriculture?

A University of California, Berkeley professor stands at the front of the room, delivering her invited talk about the potential of genetic engineering. Her audience, full of organic farming advocates, listens uneasily. She notices a man get up from his seat and move toward the front of the room. Confused, the speaker pauses mid-sentence as she watches him bend over, reach for the power cord, and unplug the projector. The room darkens and silence falls. So much for listening to the ideas of others. …

11 Oct, 2018

Q&A: ‘I imagine diversity as the central axis’ in research

The percentage of female researchers in Latin America is among the highest in the world. It has reached 44 per cent, compared with the global average of 28 per cent. However, a gender gap persists, standing in the way of women scientists having the same opportunities and recognition as their male colleagues. …

08 Oct, 2018

Illinoisans on Illinois: Tips and Tales from Around the State

I’m back from my most recent reporting trip to southern Illinois. Last week, I wrote about some things I’ve learned from getting out of Chicago and getting to know our state, and I asked you to write with suggestions for places to go and stories to look into. …
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