27 Nov, 2019

From dealing drugs to selling tortillas: the surprising future of former gang members

Becoming a gang member is often assumed to imply few long-term life opportunities beyond dying or being imprisoned. In most of the world, however, this only concerns a minority of gang members, with the majority tending to “mature out” out of their gang, and becoming (more or less) upstanding members of society. …

16 Nov, 2019

Parenting practices around the world are diverse and not all about attachment

Most parents would agree that parenting is extremely complex and challenging. What works for one child, might not work for another – even within the same family. …

15 Oct, 2019

Why do astronomers believe in dark matter?

Dark matter, by its very nature, is unseen. We cannot observe it with telescopes, and nor have particle physicists had any luck detecting it via experiments. So why do I and thousands of my colleagues believe most of the universe’s mass is made up of dark matter, rather than the conventional matter that comprises stars, planets, and all the other visible objects in our skies? …

03 Oct, 2019

Pediatrician Who Treated Immigrant Children Describes Pattern of Lapses in Medical Care in Shelters

Inside a weathered green group home in southern New Jersey, Yosary grew weaker and weaker. She felt tired all the time, and when she got out of bed in the morning, she sometimes became so dizzy she needed to lie back down. Bruises started appearing all over her body. She craved ice, chewing cups of it whenever she could. …

23 Sep, 2019

A newly designed vaccine may help stamp out remaining polio cases worldwide

Public health organizations around the world have been fighting for global eradication of polio since 1988. Through massive vaccination efforts, the incidence of polio has gone down 99% since then, with the virus eradicated from most of the countries on Earth. …

09 Sep, 2019

3 ways insecticides can be counterproductive in agriculture

Pesticides are not new and are definitely not a human invention. Plants and other microorganisms have used chemicals to defend themselves from other organisms for hundred thousands of years. Take, for example, walnut trees. Their roots produce a chemical called juglone that is secreted into the soil and inhibits nearby plant growth. This ensures the walnut tree has all the nearby nutrients and water for itself. …

28 Aug, 2019

Designing new ways to make use of ocean plastic

Beachcombing has long been a part of life for island communities. On the southwestern edge of Scarp, a small, treeless island off the coast of Harris in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides, the Mol Mòr (“big beach”) was where locals went to collect driftwood for repairing buildings and making furniture and coffins. Today there is still much driftwood, but as much or more plastic. …

12 Aug, 2019

High cost of healthy food to blame for malnutrition

Variations in food prices around the world may help explain regional differences in malnutrition and obesity, with poorer populations missing out on healthy foods including eggs and dairy products because of their high cost, a study says. …

08 Aug, 2019

El Departamento de Educación Federal Quiere Frenar la “Trama Fraudulenta de Ayuda Estudiantil” en que Padres Ceden La Custodia a Través de Tutelas Dudosas

Actualización del 31 de julio, 2019: El gobernador de Illinois J. B. Pritzker dijo el miércoles que ha ordenado a sus funcionarios que investigaran el agujero legal que permite a familias acomodadas ceder la tutela de sus hijos para intentar conseguir ayuda financiera para gente necesitada. …

05 Aug, 2019

Apartment life for families means living at close quarters, but often feeling isolated too

Newer high-rise developments in Australia’s inner-city areas are increasingly home to parents raising young children. In the 2016 Census, family households represented nearly half of apartment residents. Close to one in ten children aged 0-4 live in apartments in Australia. …

01 Aug, 2019

Mosquito-killing drug ‘reduced malaria in children’

Experts have broadly welcomed a study that found repeated mass administration of the drug ivermectin could reduce malaria cases in children under five by a fifth, but caution that more analysis is needed. …

29 Jul, 2019

Fracking Companies Lost on Trespassing, but a Court Just Gave Them a Different Win

A week after the West Virginia Supreme Court unanimously upheld the property rights of landowners battling one natural gas giant, the same court tossed out a challenge filed by another group of landowners against a different natural gas company. …

25 Jul, 2019

Four steps to make your lawn a wildlife haven – from green desert to miniature rainforest

If you could ask British insects about the habitats they prefer, they’d probably tell you that you can’t improve on grassland that’s rich with wildflowers. For farmers, though, grassland is said to be “improved” if it has been treated with fertiliser and sown with fast growing grasses. …

22 Jul, 2019

Q&A: AWaRe tool targets smart antibiotic use

Inappropriate use of antibiotics is one of the leading drivers of drug resistance, so what can doctors do to ensure they don’t perpetuate the problem? In June, the World Health Organization launched its AWaRe tool, a simple system that classifies antibiotics into three categories. These categories — Access, Watch and Reserve — are meant to help healthcare providers and policymakers to decide which antibiotics they should prescribe freely, and which ones they should restrict.

18 Jul, 2019

Ill Nuclear Workers’ Benefits Petitions Have to Be Reviewed Within 6 Months. Some Have Languished About a Decade.

Ten years ago, a security guard at Los Alamos National Laboratory submitted a petition to the federal government seeking compensation and benefits for his fellow lab workers who were sick with cancer and believed that radiation at the lab was to blame. …

15 Jul, 2019

Total eclipse, partial failure: Scientific expeditions don’t always go as planned

For centuries, astronomers have realized that total solar eclipses offer a valuable scientific opportunity. During what’s called totality, the opaque moon completely hides the bright photosphere of the sun – its thin surface layer that emits most of the sun’s light. …

11 Jul, 2019

Q&A: ‘Put patients before profits’ to beat drug resistance

As bacteria become increasingly resistant to the world’s existing armoury of antibiotics, effective new drugs are desperately needed. But an increasing number of pharmaceutical companies are abandoning the unprofitable quest to develop novel antimicrobials. …

08 Jul, 2019

In Montana, a Tough Negotiator Proved Employers Don’t Have to Pay So Much for Health Care

Marilyn Bartlett took a deep breath, drew herself up to her full 5 feet and a smidge, and told the handful of Montana officials that she had a radical strategy to bail out the state’s foundering benefit plan for its 30,000 employees and their families. …

04 Jul, 2019

Early days, but we’ve found a way to lift the IQ and resilience of Australia’s most vulnerable children

What happens in our first three years profoundly influences the rest of our lives. Children who encounter extreme adversity in those early years – including prolonged exposure to physical or sexual abuse and living in a highly stressful family environment – are likely to suffer major impairments to their development that can lead to lower educational achievement and workforce participation, involvement in risky behaviours including criminal activity, and lifelong health problems. …

01 Jul, 2019

In Pennsylvania, It’s Open Season on Undocumented Immigrants

QUAKERTOWN, PA — From the time they first flirted at a party, Anne and Ludvin Franco were inseparable. It did not matter that Anne, a waitress, was Pennsylvania Dutch going back generations, while Ludvin, a cook, had grown up in the scrublands of eastern Guatemala. …
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